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Posted Thursday, May 27, 2021 2:16:00 PM
One thing people love to talk about is food. How often do you find yourself having a meal, when the discussion turns to a previous or future meal? Sometimes, we complain about the food. Parashat Beha'alotcha has the famous story, studied by our sixth graders, of when Bnai Yisrael complain...
Posted Thursday, May 6, 2021 11:54:00 AM
Lag B'Omer, which took place last Friday, commemorates the halting of the deaths of Rabbi Akiva's 24,000 students, who died for not properly showing respect for one another. I'd like to share a thought that circulates my mind every year around this time...
Posted Friday, Apr 23, 2021 4:13:00 PM
In this week's parasha, Acharei Mot/Kedoshim, Hashem instructs Moshe on the process by which Aharon will purify himself on Yom Kippur. In Vayikrah, perek tet-zayin, pasuk gimmel, Hashem says...
Posted Thursday, Apr 15, 2021 11:41:00 AM
The Sages suggest that you can find an allusion in the Parasha to the events that occur during the week, and this week's Parasha is no exception. While the Mitzvah of Brit Milah (circumcision) is commanded in Parashat Lech Lecha, additional details are derived from a pasuk at the beginning of Parashat Tazria...
Posted Thursday, Apr 8, 2021 4:11:00 PM
This week's parsha begins with the words, "ויהי ביום השמיני", "It was on the eighth day." (Vayikra 9:1). As the eighth graders studied earlier this year, Rashi tells us it was the eighth day of the inauguration of the Mishkan, which fell on the first day of Nissan. For the seven previous days, Moshe took apart and rebuilt the Mishkan, teaching Aharon and his sons how to perform the Avodah, the Temple service. Thus, Moshe served as the Kohen Gadol for these seven days. On the eighth day, all was finally ready to implement the daily Avodah, and Aharon would take over...
Posted Friday, Mar 12, 2021 12:13:00 PM
In the world of online transactions today, there is often something you have to do besides putting in your contact and/or credit card information: you might have to check a box that says "I am not a robot." The necessity behind this function results from internet bots that can be programmed by hackers to jam and crash electronic commerce. They are bad for business and government. These bots do not create, but they are intended to destroy. So whenever we make a transaction online, we have to confirm that indeed, we are not robots but real humans intending to use the product with which we are interacting. When seeing this box pop up a few days ago, I was thinking about how this statement, "I am not a robot," is the bumper sticker of avodat Hashem, of serving God...
Posted Friday, Feb 19, 2021 11:13:16 AM
There was a movie that was popular in my high school years that portrays the way some high schoolers do not have the best derech eretz. In one particular instance, Regina says to a girl who passes by, "I love that skirt! Where did you get it from?"
Posted Friday, Feb 12, 2021 9:26:00 AM
When a person attends a wedding, it's very easy to feel emotionally caught up in the beauty of the event. Nothing makes a person want to get married themselves quite like attending the wedding of a friend. Many singles will find themselves dreaming of the day that they have a beautiful wedding, and how the spectacle of the wedding day is indicative of the what the marriage is going to be like...
Posted Thursday, Jan 28, 2021 5:33:34 PM
Imagine you see somebody getting ready to celebrate on January 1st. Curious about why they are so happy, you ask them what they are celebrating. With great excitement they respond that the last fiscal year ended on December 31st, and they're excited that from now on, any money they earn will have taxes taken out for the new year. This answer would certainly leave you wondering why the person was so happy. If this seems strange to us, then we should be asking what our recent celebration of Tu B'Shevat was all about...
Posted Thursday, Jan 21, 2021 9:55:00 AM
In this week's parasha, parshat Bo, bnei Yisrael receive their first mitzvah, that of celebrating the start of every new month. Practically speaking, Hashem is teaching Moshe about the start of the calendar. Rashi, in his interpretation, places significant emphasis on the word הַזֶּ֛ה (this)...
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